Newcastle United 2 Hull City 3

1662 days. That seems a long time. 1662 days is how long we Hull City fans have had to wait since Manucho poked home a Garcia cross in our last away win in top flight. Maybe that’s a little unfair, we have spent three seasons in the second tier, so maybe 26 away league games without a win is a better comparison. Steve Bruce brought his Tigers side back to his native North East. With Figueroa missing on compassionate leave and Koren out of the side due to a broken foot, the team was shuffled to face a Newcastle side who had won 2 and drawn 1 of their last three games. McGregor Elmohamady Chester Davies Rosenior Quinn Huddlestone Livermore Brady Aluko Graham The early exchanges of the game set the pattern for much of the first half. The impressive Cabaye frequently combined with Santon and Remy on their left wing, as they appeared to target the defensive weakness of Elmohamady. On the whole, the City back line proved a formidable foe to these Newcastle attacks, giving the home team plenty of possession, but adopting a ‘thou shall not pass’ attitude once they reached the edge of the Tigers area. At the other end, chances were few and far between. In our last games against Newcastle, I was struck by how Coloccini struggled with the physical battles with Cousin. Whilst he’s a composed defender, he still struggles with the physical side of the game, this time it was the much less physically imposing Aluko who brushed aside the Argentinian, but was unable to direct his shot goal wards. However within a minute, City were trailing. Sissoko works some space in the right hand channel before crossing over to the left. Elmohamady misjudged the flight of the ball, allowing it to loop over his head and onto the foot of Santon. His central cross is met by the meaty head of Remy, putting his header beyond the reach of McGregor. In the previous match against Cardiff, Graham was singled out for his missing of easy chances. This week he seemed to be playing a different role. He may now have broken his goal-scoring duck, but was proving a strong and effective target man against the Newcastle back-line, bringing other players into the game. That said, when a chance did fall his way, he managed to scuff his shot giving Krul an easy ball to pick up. Despite Graham not scoring, it’s not proving too much of an issue as City are finding other players to carry that job out. Again Newcastle had been given plenty of possession, whilst rarely being given the opportunity to threaten McGregor’s goal. City were starting to get better chances up to the equaliser. A Krul ball out finds it was to Quinn on the right side. The Irish midfielder passes to Aluko at the top of the Newcastle D, before the ball is played over to Brady finding space down the left channel. Whilst the shot seemed to head straight at Krul, it sneaked under the netman’s body and into the back of the net. The Newcastle trio of Santon, Cabaye and Remy continue to be a thorn in the side of the City defence. At that point, I thought a reshuffle of the City wide players may have helped the situation. Elmohamady to right wing, Rosenior to right back, Brady to left back and Quinn to the left wing. But City kept their shape and held on for the most part. However, just as we were preparing for the half-time break, Newcastle put themselves back in front. Santon again attacks the left wing, before passing back to Cabaye. His shot is blocked by Chester, but falls nicely to Remy, who’s got plenty of space to pick his spot and put the Geordies 2-1 up. Much is said about the 7 levels the away fans have to ascent of the Leazes stand. To my immediate left, a large screen is constructed to keep out the weather – providing an effective greenhouse to those in the stand. This does however provide some great views over the Tyne valley past the youth clubs of Byker, the football pitches of Glipton and over the water to Gateshead. The Leazes and Milburn stands provides half of a massive stadium, although the Gallowgate and East stand, being somewhat lower gives the ground a feeling of being somewhat unfinished. That may well be down to being unable to expand on those sides, due to the nearby residential areas. Soon after the half-time break, City are once again back on level terms. After Aluko is knocked down, having received the ball from a throw-in, a free kick is awarded about 30 yards out to the left of the field. Brady’s kick is met by the head of Elmohamady, who’d glided beyond his marker, to loop a header off the far post and into the goal. Slight confusion did reign after the announcer suggested it was Chester who had scored, but no matter, the score line was 2-2. That early goal spurred City to be more adventurous than the first half. Quinn in particular seemed to be finding more space to attack his wing. However whilst Graham was still proving to be an effective target up front, his goal scoring eye was still proving less than effective. This was by no means one way traffic. Newcastle still seemed to be attacking through the trio of Santon, Cabaye and Remy, but they were getting less luck out of the stubborn centre-back pairing of Chester with his well timed interceptions and Davies with a more physical approach to getting the ball clear. On the other side of the pitch Ben Arfa had largely been kept quiet by the busy efficiency of Rosenior, so the French winger found himself having to drop deeper and deeper to get any time on the ball. A rare opportunity did seem to be hit out of play by Ben Arfa, before the referee Atkinson awarded a corner. Fortunately Yanga-Mbiwa put his shot over. The sight of Atkinson in the referee’s shirt had filled me with dread before the game. I was convinced he was one of those referees that we never got any decisions from. However I was proven wrong. From my high vantage point, we appeared to be getting the majority of the decisions. Many of which I thought should have gone the other way. So perhaps I shouldn’t complain too much about Ben Arfa being awarded that corner. The next Newcastle attacks end Cabaye’s day. He once again attacks down the City right, but is met by a strong but fair challenge from Davies. Initially it seemed that he went down far too easy, as Newcastle put the ball out of play when they had a very promising attack on the cards. He did however limp off to be replaced by Gouffran. After Quinn fells Sissoko, Ben Arfa is given a chance on the free-kick, whilst Rosenior is restricted to remain 10 yards away, but perhaps his continues presence put the Frenchman off, meaning he could only put it wide. After Boyd replaces Quinn, City appear to be trying to take all three points from the game. A few set pieces fall City’s way, yet we are less than efficient with these, firstly with a Huddlestone free-kick finding Elmohamady before Krul punches clear, then a Brady corner which Sissoko heads away. With the game becoming more open, Newcastle’s chances are blocked by City’s men at the back. Chester is having a great game, forever getting his toe to the ball and constantly stopping the Black and White attacks. When they do find a way past Chester, then there’s Davies. Is it too much to suggest these could be one of the best City centre-back pairings? I’m not sure Turner & Zayette would compare and as for Sonko… A substitution for both sides sees Cisse replaced by Marveaux for Newcastle and Meyler on for Brady. Within a few minutes, Aluko gives City the lead. Huddlestone plays the ball wide to Rosenior, who passes up the line to Boyd. Boyd easily goes past his full-back, before crossing to the edge of the area, where Aluko’s lurking to hit a volley past Krul and into the net. After the match, many comments were comparing this to Windass’s volley at Wembley. Whilst I don’t believe it’s as good, it was a fantastic finish from an equally good move. With the lead gained, City again drop back to hold on to the three points, inviting more Newcastle possession. Ben Arfa drops deeper to try and gain possession, before being felled by Meyler. His free-kick is however passed short to Santon, who can only blast the ball at the City wall. Whilst Grahams goal scoring touch had deserted him, the Tiger support gave him a standing ovation when he was replaced by Sagbo, due to his strong target man play. Sagbo offered a bit more energy running up front, but with Newcastle penning City back he was an occasional outlet. Newcastle keep probing for an opening but every time, there’s Chester nicking the ball away. In the final minute of normal time, Davies breaks forward before passing to Huddlestone in an off-side position. Huddlestone decides to shoot after the whistle goes, thus seeing Atkinson book him for kicking the ball away. As the clock reaches 90, Newcastle find themselves a very good chance to get level. A cross from the right finds Sissoko free at the back post. Surely there can only be one outcome. But no, there’s another as he directs his shot wide of the post and off the advertising hoardings. Before McGregor can take his goal kick, Chester goes down, holding the top of his leg. After treatment, Huddlestone fills in at centre-back with Chester returning to run about up front. This however proves useless with Chester then having to hobble off with a hamstring injury. By now, McGregor is obviously taking his time over every kick, to the frustration of the remaining home support. A great break by Meyler relieves the pressure on the defence, before winning a free kick by the corner flag. Sissoko’s frustration gets the better of him as he pushes out at Sagbo, to also find his name taken. A final chance comes after a long Newcastle ball into the box, which is held by McGregor, and congratulated by Davies, much like Brown on Myhill at the end of the Playoff game. The final whistle is then greeted in the away end by Total Tiger Mayhem, whilst on the pitch we once again get to see Elmohamady’s ‘Uncle at a wedding’ dance. The match was therefore a great win for City, whilst walking away from the ground, the home fans didn’t seem too despondent, having heard of Sunderland’s latest defeat. So from a run of 26 away games in top flight without a win, to a run of a 1 game winning run. Things keep looking up on the pitch